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The shape of these sites was not determined by terrain; they were intentionally built in this design.

The most famous of these foot-shaped sites—also called —is on Mt. This site was discovered by Adam Zertal and his survey team in 1980 and subsequently excavated from 1982–1989.

There they uncovered a large altar, which was built of unhewn stones.

The altar can be divided into two strata—both dated to the Iron Age I.

Additionally, Hawkins’s books BAS Library Members: Read the full article “Israelite Footprints: Has Adam Zertal Found the Biblical Altar on Mt.

Ebal and the Footprints of the Israelites Settling the Promised Land? Hawkins in the March/April 2016 issue of Tags: adam adam zertal amihai amihai mazar amos anson rainey archaeological archaeological discoveries archaeological sites archaeologist archaeologists Archaeology archaeology review archaeology today avraham faust bas library bib arch bib arch org Bible bible and archaeology bible history bible history daily Bible Interpretation bible secrets bible secrets revealed Biblical Biblical Archaeology Biblical Archaeology Review biblical scholars biblical topics biblicalarchaeology ethnogenesis hebrew Hebrew Bible hebrews hosea iron age israelites joshua joshua in the bible land of the bible love your neighbor micah passover samuel the bible and The Hebrew Bible the land of the bible into the illuminating world of the Bible with a BAS All-Access membership.

Hawkins concludes that these sites are “unique and appear to have been built by semi-nomads who used a pottery repertoire similar to that of the new population group that entered Canaan from the east at this time [Iron Age I].” The foot-shaped sites may have served as gathering places for the semi-nomads, and it is possible that they had a cultic purpose as well—similar to the Mt. Since the pottery at the foot-shaped sites matches the pottery of the new population entering Canaan—a group that some have identified as the Israelites—some believe that these foot-shaped sites are Israelite settlements.

Hawkins—“Israelite Footprints: Has Adam Zertal Found the Biblical Altar on Mt.

Ebal and the Footprints of the Israelites Settling the Promised Land? This article also addresses why these sites were built in the shape of a footprint or sandal.

Perhaps future archaeological discoveries will settle the matter, but for now these sites remain a mystery.

For a more in-depth treatment of this subject, read the full article by Ralph K.

Hawkins concludes that these sites are “unique and appear to have been built by semi-nomads who used a pottery repertoire similar to that of the new population group that entered Canaan from the east at this time [Iron Age I].” The foot-shaped sites may have served as gathering places for the semi-nomads, and it is possible that they had a cultic purpose as well—similar to the Mt. Since the pottery at the foot-shaped sites matches the pottery of the new population entering Canaan—a group that some have identified as the Israelites—some believe that these foot-shaped sites are Israelite settlements.Hawkins—“Israelite Footprints: Has Adam Zertal Found the Biblical Altar on Mt.Ebal and the Footprints of the Israelites Settling the Promised Land? This article also addresses why these sites were built in the shape of a footprint or sandal.Perhaps future archaeological discoveries will settle the matter, but for now these sites remain a mystery.For a more in-depth treatment of this subject, read the full article by Ralph K.The dropped unit may be suggested by the meaning or grammatical form of other words: Ty na rabotu (idesh’)?