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28-May-2019 08:22

There’s no point in trying to blindly bump into a solution, so whether it’s sketching in the park or reading a book, I avoid trying to use brute force to get out… To use this horribly overused sentence “I get inspiration from everywhere”, I do get ideas from the most banal things around me.

To be honest, I rarely get stuck in a creative rut, there’s more than enough ideas swirling around in my head, its just a matter of priorities and time.

What follows are 25 strategies from these creatives to spark your inspiration; hopefully you’ll find something helpful in there.

I encourage you to list your favorite strategies as well in the comments. I think I rely on a few tactics to keep my creativity flowing.

The dark circles represent the keys that should be closed to make the note. Follow along with our saxophone fingering chart as your first step to learning how to play the instrument.I’ve been working on a typeface design on and off for almost a year, and while it is an incredibly gratifying and educational experience, it does stop me from doing other things…So maybe in that way I get stuck in a mental rut: wanting to move on to the next thing, but not before I finish the typeface.I’ll probably go play the guitar between this paragraph and the next. Often referred to as “writer’s block”, the concept of an inspiration rut is unfortunately very familiar to every creative in any field. Given this, we all develop strategies to combat such a scenario.Not all are foolproof, but it’s safe to say that most creative people have some battle plan for dealing with the dreaded “blank page”.

The dark circles represent the keys that should be closed to make the note. Follow along with our saxophone fingering chart as your first step to learning how to play the instrument.I’ve been working on a typeface design on and off for almost a year, and while it is an incredibly gratifying and educational experience, it does stop me from doing other things…So maybe in that way I get stuck in a mental rut: wanting to move on to the next thing, but not before I finish the typeface.I’ll probably go play the guitar between this paragraph and the next. Often referred to as “writer’s block”, the concept of an inspiration rut is unfortunately very familiar to every creative in any field. Given this, we all develop strategies to combat such a scenario.Not all are foolproof, but it’s safe to say that most creative people have some battle plan for dealing with the dreaded “blank page”.But then I’m being really anal and slow with the work on the typeface because I want it to be as perfect as I can make it. Anyway I got the idea for the typeface by looking at some older type design work I had done (yes, sometimes your own work can be a source of ideas — thats what sketches and notebooks are for), and looking at vintage book covers and Wim Crouwel’s Hiroshima poster. Which reminds me of something I saw on TV: Years ago I saw a documentary on a Belgian comic book artist who had adapted Joe Haldeman’s Forever War into a graphic novel, and a journalist asked him where he got all ideas for the designs of the space ships, and the artist pulled out a piece of a plastic hull for electric wiring (he had an background in architecture) and said he spotted that thing lying around one day in his studio and thought it would be ideal to design a spacecraft. Ideas are everywhere, especially when you’re not really looking for them.