Creating self updating applications with the net framework

02-Jun-2019 02:31

In this case, we need to create an App Service Plan where we’ll host portal and tenant apps.

The initial size is not a problem: we can decide to scale the solution up or out at any time (in this case only when the application is able to scale out – we don’t handle this scenario here).

We will need to acquire the tenant name and trigger tenant deployment. First, in the Register View Model, defined under the Models folder, Account View file, we add a Tenant Name property: Portal applications can be great for allowing the tenant owner to manage its own tenant, configuring or handling subscription-related tasks to the supplier company.First, we will need to create an Azure Resource Group to collect all the services: All of the data from different tenants, including the portal itself, need to be contained inside distinct Azure SQL databases. As a personal service used infrequently it can be a waste of money assigning a reserved quantity of Database Transaction Units (DTUs) to a single database.We can invest in a pool of DTUs to be shared among all SQL database instances.We can start by creating an SQL server service from the portal: We need to create a pool of database resources (DTU) shared among databases: We need to configure the pricing tier that defines the maximum resources allocated per database: The first database that we need to manually deploy is the portal database, where a user will register the tenant.From the My Accountant Pool blade, we can create a new database that will be immediately associated to the pool: From the database blade, we can see the connection: We will use that connection string to configure the portal app in web.config: We need to create the shared resource for the web.

We will need to acquire the tenant name and trigger tenant deployment. First, in the Register View Model, defined under the Models folder, Account View file, we add a Tenant Name property: Portal applications can be great for allowing the tenant owner to manage its own tenant, configuring or handling subscription-related tasks to the supplier company.

First, we will need to create an Azure Resource Group to collect all the services: All of the data from different tenants, including the portal itself, need to be contained inside distinct Azure SQL databases. As a personal service used infrequently it can be a waste of money assigning a reserved quantity of Database Transaction Units (DTUs) to a single database.

We can invest in a pool of DTUs to be shared among all SQL database instances.

We can start by creating an SQL server service from the portal: We need to create a pool of database resources (DTU) shared among databases: We need to configure the pricing tier that defines the maximum resources allocated per database: The first database that we need to manually deploy is the portal database, where a user will register the tenant.

From the My Accountant Pool blade, we can create a new database that will be immediately associated to the pool: From the database blade, we can see the connection: We will use that connection string to configure the portal app in web.config: We need to create the shared resource for the web.

To reach an economy of scale that allows every cloud user to scale as needed without paying for or suffering from overprovisioned resources, cloud infrastructure must be oversized for a single user and sized for a pool of potential users that shares the same group of resources during a certain period of time.