Dating longcase clocks

23-Sep-2019 17:00

These are generally wound by pulling down on the weight-pulley cord inside the case.Whatever lies beneath the hood, the most immediate difference between one longcase and another is seen in the design of the case or the treatment of the face.The need to protect the movement within a high case to house the heavy drive weights, and soon afterwards a long pendulum that beat once every second, led to a style of clock that remained popular for more than two centuries.

These range from a simple calendar aperture or a strike/silent options (for an uninterrupted night's sleep) to rocking ship automatons and rolling lunar cycle (knowledge of the phase of the moon was of great importance when planning a journey during the hours of darkness) to annual calendar dials and the times of sunrise, high and low tides.

These range from the simplest estate-made pine case and painted tin dial, to Boulle marquetry and silvered brass.

But both will typically reflect the fashions of the time and provide a clue to date. On a national scale this can be seen in the differences between circular dial clocks made in early 19th century Scotland, the potbellied Comtoise clocks from the Franche-Comté region of France and the white-painted Bornholm and Mora clocks from Scandinavia.

Painted longcase and grandfather clock dials are found in many different sizes and styles, English clock dials are generally square or arched top, usually makers did apply their name to the dials of clocks they made, however Painted dial do deteriorate over time with sunlight, fires, and smoking, detail fades and can be rubbed away with cleaning and making it difficult to identify a maker.

With Help from improving forensic technology and careful restoration techniques it is usually possible to identify information missing from a painted dial so they can be restored to their original condition using originally used materials carried out by an experienced qualified restorer.

These range from a simple calendar aperture or a strike/silent options (for an uninterrupted night's sleep) to rocking ship automatons and rolling lunar cycle (knowledge of the phase of the moon was of great importance when planning a journey during the hours of darkness) to annual calendar dials and the times of sunrise, high and low tides.These range from the simplest estate-made pine case and painted tin dial, to Boulle marquetry and silvered brass.But both will typically reflect the fashions of the time and provide a clue to date. On a national scale this can be seen in the differences between circular dial clocks made in early 19th century Scotland, the potbellied Comtoise clocks from the Franche-Comté region of France and the white-painted Bornholm and Mora clocks from Scandinavia.Painted longcase and grandfather clock dials are found in many different sizes and styles, English clock dials are generally square or arched top, usually makers did apply their name to the dials of clocks they made, however Painted dial do deteriorate over time with sunlight, fires, and smoking, detail fades and can be rubbed away with cleaning and making it difficult to identify a maker.With Help from improving forensic technology and careful restoration techniques it is usually possible to identify information missing from a painted dial so they can be restored to their original condition using originally used materials carried out by an experienced qualified restorer.Typical 17th-19th century eight-day movements run on two weights suspended on a cable and pulley - one driving the hands and the other the striking mechanism - and require two keyholes for winding.