Dating psychology games

12-Aug-2019 10:24

and then I had several students contact me asking if I still had their pages so they could transfer them to another site. Dubbed the Benjamin Franklin effect, this video describes a study investigating what happens when one partner puts a lot of effort into a relationship.

All in all it was a fun semester." Stress and conflict in relationships - A podcast from Science of Relationships -- Are there any podcasts you have your students listen to outside of class and then discuss in class or have them respond to in some other way? Via Wikipedia, the Benjamin Franklin effect is illustrated when "a person who has done someone a favor is more likely to do that person another favor than they would be if they had received a favor from that person.

I've only read a summary and haven't been able to get the original yet, so don't quote me on this. Sexual Economics: Sex as Female Resource for Social Exchange in Heterosexual Interactions.

There's always a very nice scatterplot, as the demo itself produces pretty good matching.

I gave students the right to remove their picture if they wanted to, but I think only one or two out of 120 did so.

We talked about face recognition in the brain section, perception allowed for some unique illusions with face symmetery and other facial illusions, in learning and memory we talked about remembering names and/or faces, we talked about facial _expression_, the baby's innate fascination of faces, culture and beauty, I can't remember all of the little and not so little tie ins off the top of my head.

It also provides opportunities to talk about things like naturalistic fallacy errors and the temptation to evaluate psychological theories (provisional and testable descriptions of nature) by the way they make us feel or the social ends they might or might not serve." The Similarity Project - In one version of this activity, starting in groups of four, students are asked to identify as many similarities as they can between their different groups.

Then they join larger and larger groups to see if they can identify even more similarities.

There's always a very nice scatterplot, as the demo itself produces pretty good matching.I gave students the right to remove their picture if they wanted to, but I think only one or two out of 120 did so.We talked about face recognition in the brain section, perception allowed for some unique illusions with face symmetery and other facial illusions, in learning and memory we talked about remembering names and/or faces, we talked about facial _expression_, the baby's innate fascination of faces, culture and beauty, I can't remember all of the little and not so little tie ins off the top of my head.It also provides opportunities to talk about things like naturalistic fallacy errors and the temptation to evaluate psychological theories (provisional and testable descriptions of nature) by the way they make us feel or the social ends they might or might not serve." The Similarity Project - In one version of this activity, starting in groups of four, students are asked to identify as many similarities as they can between their different groups.Then they join larger and larger groups to see if they can identify even more similarities.Then he asks them to analyze the plays in terms of how close relationships are portrayed.