Free text and fuvk now no c c

01-Mar-2019 22:18

This gives a one-time code which I enter together with my password to login.However, this is not all - in order to do anything meaningful (aka transfer money), I need a confirmation code, which is done by me typing into the little machine the amount, part of the account number being credited, and of course my banking pin to begin with.Because they are hellaciously expensive, in terms of:* cost to retrofit the backend of these systems onto the bank's retail software* cost to roll out tokens to customers* ongoing support costs for e.g.lost or broken tokens To all that, you have to layer on the fact that tokens are priced for a different market (enterprise security), so the existing products aren't packaged in a way that makes them palatable to (say) Bank of America's many tens of millions of customers.Banks enforce these rules because some internal security group set the rule a while back and thats what they use.

Free text and fuvk now no c c-74

Because they are hellaciously expensive You know, I have a checking account that I don't keep a lot of money in (because I rarely write checks nowadays) but have had so long that I don't really want to close it.

I was surprised to notice last week that the bank is charging me /month in account fees unless I keep a minimum of 00 in it at all times (effectively, an interest-free loan to the bank).

For 4 a year, I think they can afford an RSA token or something better than the existing nonsense.

But I have never seen a study that shows this to be so.

It may well be that many set their banking password as the first account they ever used on the Internet and then reuse this same password for subsequent systems.

Because they are hellaciously expensive You know, I have a checking account that I don't keep a lot of money in (because I rarely write checks nowadays) but have had so long that I don't really want to close it.I was surprised to notice last week that the bank is charging me /month in account fees unless I keep a minimum of 00 in it at all times (effectively, an interest-free loan to the bank).For 4 a year, I think they can afford an RSA token or something better than the existing nonsense.But I have never seen a study that shows this to be so.It may well be that many set their banking password as the first account they ever used on the Internet and then reuse this same password for subsequent systems.So, I effectively sign the transaction, and having the reader totally offline makes me somewhat confident in its security even if my linux laptop were compromised.