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27-Jul-2019 13:40

A and C, however, are not superfluous and need to be kept.An important characteristic of such a superfluous logic cube, is that if (B, C) fulfills the condition, and (A, B) as well, then (A, C) also fulfills the condition for sure (both B and C are superfluous).To be exact, this is in one of the simplest parts of the optimization algorithm, and is used very often as a "quick and dirty" optimization pass in the middle of more complex optimization algorithms, so performance is critical.A and B describe logic cubes of a single logic function, which are vectors of 0, 1, Don't Care (also represented as X, indicates both 0 and 1 are accepted) or Illegal Value (indicating error), each entry in these vectors describes a single input. For example, a cube "X1" would be true if the inputs are 01 or 11, and false otherwise.I'm not sure if Java allows collections to store 'null', but assuming that's permitted, a fourth alternative would be to use list Iterator.set(null); instead of actually removing the element, and then going through the list again and actually removing all the "nulls".While still requiring a second traversal through the list, it does not require maintaining extra data structures.In technical terms, a logic cube is an n-input, 1-output Programmable Logic Array (PLA) description.

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A third alternative I can think of is to create a second list of "elements to remove", and then go through the list and remove them from the main list.Then you could do it with two "iterators" because the Singly Linked List itself is the iterator.I suspect there is no such implementation in Java because this type of list naturally pushes you in a tail recursive direction, which isn't properly optimized in Java.Not much performance concern in building new lists even when fairly large. From what you wrote, it seems that the pairs are not directional, as in (A, B) is equal to (B, A). But then this clashes with the fact that you only remove the second element of the pair when the condition if satisfied.Your operation could potentially be non-deterministic depending on the ordering in the list.

A third alternative I can think of is to create a second list of "elements to remove", and then go through the list and remove them from the main list.Then you could do it with two "iterators" because the Singly Linked List itself is the iterator.I suspect there is no such implementation in Java because this type of list naturally pushes you in a tail recursive direction, which isn't properly optimized in Java.Not much performance concern in building new lists even when fairly large. From what you wrote, it seems that the pairs are not directional, as in (A, B) is equal to (B, A). But then this clashes with the fact that you only remove the second element of the pair when the condition if satisfied.Your operation could potentially be non-deterministic depending on the ordering in the list.If you have to use Linked List I would do it like you did in your second example.