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28-Jun-2019 07:58

For the British Broadcasting Corporation's The Long, Long Walkabout (1975) he acted as linkman for sites around Australia and South East Asia.

His work and publications on the dingo extended over several decades, and revealed the same ability to strike a new scholarly path.

In a series of expeditions to Queensland in the 1960s Macintosh established the geological context of the fossilized Talgai skull which had been found near Warwick in 1886, and studied and publicized by (Sir) Edgeworth David and J. In 1970 at Lake Nitchie, New South Wales, he and his technical officer Ken Smith excavated the 7000-year-old skeleton of a 6 ft 2 ins (188 cm) male.

Macintosh and his team reassembled a necklace in which the profusion of Sarcophilus (Tasmanian Devil) canine teeth (162 from perhaps 100 animals) showed the importance of the deceased, suggested the practice of elite burials, and indicated that the region was more fertile than in recent times.

Neil William George Macintosh (1906-1977), professor of anatomy and anthropologist, was born on 27 December 1906 at Marrickville, Sydney, only child of native-born parents Gregory Grant John Macintosh,...

View the full record at Australian Dictionary of Biography Neil Macintosh was an anatomist and anthropologist whose research focused on the antiquity, migrations and place in human history of the indigenous people of Australia.

Having set up a breeding colony of dingoes, he confirmed their resistance to domestication and training, helping to characterize their place in Aboriginal culture. He loved his subject and was illuminating in the dissecting-room and lecture theatre.Working on osteology, blood groups, fingerprints, forensic medicine and several other fields, he made important contributions to the study of variations in Aboriginal culture and migratory arrivals over time.In his extensive examination of significant ancient bones and artefacts he discovered or documented several of major significance.He supported the visits to Australia of Czech biological anthropologists at a time when cultural exchanges with communist countries were difficult. one person, in the future, through his own vigour, application, broad view, and natural wisdom, keeping so many of the reins of the subject in his hands and driving it ahead so far'.In recognition of his outstanding contributions to the study of the origins of man, he was awarded the Hrdlicka medal—which was presented to him in 1970 in the Czech city of Humpolec (Hrdlicka's birthplace)—and the Anthropos medal (1970) by the Moravian Museum in Brno, Czechoslovakia. An American colleague wrote of the contrast between Macintosh's lively personality and his laborious scholarship: 'He was the right man at the right time: it is not easy to imagine . Jonathan Stone, 'Macintosh, Neil William (1906–1977)', Australian Dictionary of Biography, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University, published first in hardcopy 2000, accessed online 1 September 2019.

Having set up a breeding colony of dingoes, he confirmed their resistance to domestication and training, helping to characterize their place in Aboriginal culture. He loved his subject and was illuminating in the dissecting-room and lecture theatre.

Working on osteology, blood groups, fingerprints, forensic medicine and several other fields, he made important contributions to the study of variations in Aboriginal culture and migratory arrivals over time.

In his extensive examination of significant ancient bones and artefacts he discovered or documented several of major significance.

He supported the visits to Australia of Czech biological anthropologists at a time when cultural exchanges with communist countries were difficult. one person, in the future, through his own vigour, application, broad view, and natural wisdom, keeping so many of the reins of the subject in his hands and driving it ahead so far'.

In recognition of his outstanding contributions to the study of the origins of man, he was awarded the Hrdlicka medal—which was presented to him in 1970 in the Czech city of Humpolec (Hrdlicka's birthplace)—and the Anthropos medal (1970) by the Moravian Museum in Brno, Czechoslovakia. An American colleague wrote of the contrast between Macintosh's lively personality and his laborious scholarship: 'He was the right man at the right time: it is not easy to imagine . Jonathan Stone, 'Macintosh, Neil William (1906–1977)', Australian Dictionary of Biography, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University, published first in hardcopy 2000, accessed online 1 September 2019.

An upright figure, open-faced, charismatic, sometimes abrupt, but one whose anger never lasted, he gave a sense of moment to all his ventures.